Canadian Human Rights Vary, Depending on “You”

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Canadian Human Rights Vary, Depending on “You”

Canadian human rights vary, depending on who you are. It is a lie that human rights make Canadians equal. This creates tensions and infighting. It also distracts Canadians from working together to address the real issues.

Canadian human rights vary, depending on who “you” are. It is a lie that human rights make Canadians equal. Downtown Winnipeg – Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Josel Catindoy, Tourism Winnipeg.

Summary

Canadian human rights vary. It depends on who “you” are. It is a lie that human rights make Canadians equal. This lie creates tensions and infighting. It also distracts Canadians from working together to address the real issues.

Background

Canadian Bill of Rights by John Diefenbaker has enjoyment of property but no property rights. This is because property rights is provincial and not federal jurisdiction.

The Canadian Bill of Rights depends on who “you” are. It is only for private or natural persons, and not for officers.

Many believe humans are equal in dignity and rights[1]. After all, the Canadian Bill of Rights says so. But looking around clearly reveals the opposite – Canadian human rights vary. Read on to find out how they can vary, and how that depends on “you”!

It is a lie that human rights make Canadians equal.

Canadian Human Rights Vary: Being Equal is a Lie

Canadian human rights vary. It depends on whether you consent to representing certain officers.

Officers

Sir Edward Coke, in this book, says, “a corporation sole is a man who fills an office.” Coke was Attorney General for England and Wales; the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; and Chief Justice of the King’s Bench. He also authored the 1628 Petition of Rights. So I guess he knows what he’s talking about.

An officer is a legal person in law. Sir Edward Coke says another legal definition for officer is “corporation sole”. In other words, an officer is a special kind of corporation that a sole individual chooses to represent[2]. This fits with the infamous Meads divorce case. In that case, Justice Rooke states, “If a person wishes to add a legal ‘layer’ to themselves, then a corporation is the proper approach.[3]

“A corporation sole is a man who fills an office” – Sir Edward Coke

Officers are Artificial Persons

In law, officers are artificial persons that natural or private persons choose to represent. (Human beings recognized by a legal system are called private or natural persons).

Officers: Special Powers, Privileges, Immunities and Exemptions

Offices, and officers who fill them, have special powers and/or privileges. These may include legal immunities, and possibly even exemptions.

Picture credit: http://bit.ly2ewSz0V

Meads v. Mead’s Judge Rooke. It seems he is here as a private person. Picture: http://bit.ly2ewSz0V

Associate Chief Justice Rooke from the above Meads case is a perfect example. Representing a court officer, as a judge, gives him the legal power to render binding decisions. In addition, judges are exempt from libel. However, as a natural or private person, Mr. John Rooke does not have those legal powers and exemptions.

Officers have special powers and/or privileges

Canadian Human Rights Vary (if Unalienable)

The Ark of the Covenant holds the Ten Commandments. At least that’s what Indiana Jones says.

Canada, and its provinces (outside Quebec) have common law-based legal systems. That means it is based on God from the Bible granting inalienable human rights. (Inalienable means cannot be changed). This includes the Ten Commandments. In contrast, Quebec’s civil law-based legal system means that Province grants unalienable “human rights”. Unalienable means those so-called “human rights” can vary anytime.

However, Canada wants to vary “human rights” under a common law-based legal system. The solution? Get you to represent officers!

Canadian Human Rights Vary For Officers

Inalienable Human Rights: for Natural (or Private) Persons ONLY

The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Section 15(1). www.haikudeck.com

Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Section 15(1) www.haikudeck.com

We theorize in this earlier article how Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms bisects human rights into two groups. The Charter, s.15(1), recognizes the first group as inalienable rights granted by God in the Bible. The Parkdale Hotel Ltd. v. A-G of Canada (1986) court case corroborates this. It states, “Subsection 15(1) of the Charter extends only to natural persons.” In other words, if “you” are an officer, then 15(1) doesn’t apply.

Subsection 15(1) of the Charter extends only to natural persons” – 1986 Federal Court case

Unalienable “Human Rights”: for Officers

The Charter, Section 15(2).

Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Section 15(2) www.haikudeck.com

In contrast, the Charter, S.15(2), allows the second group unalienable, so-called “human rights”. They are for those who, by representing various officers, use programs for making their lives better. Some are listed below.

Canada Summer Jobs Program Participants

The Core Mandate of Canada Summer Jobs includes endorsing abortion and LGBTQ2 rights. Employers must attest its Core Mandate. Some think this violates inalienable human rights. But our income tax theory (“Apu’s Theory”) can explain why Core Mandate does not violate them.

The Core Mandate of Canada Summer Jobs includes endorsing abortion and LGBTQ2 rights. (https://cmckenna.liberal.ca)

As we discussed in this article, one such program is Canada Summer Jobs. That is why participants, as Income Tax Act (“ITA”) “officers”, must abide to that program’s Core Mandate, including endorsing abortion and LGBTQ2 “human rights”.

Registered Churchs’ Members

Sample receipt showing CRA registered charitable status

Sample receipt with CRA registered charitable status

In yet another article, we theorized how Canada can restrict charities, such as churches, from spending more than 10% of their budget on political agendas. That is because only registered charities can issue tax deduction receipts. They can only be applied against taxable income. Our income tax research, “Apu’s Theory”, concludes tax deductions are only usable by ITA “officers”. That is why only ITA “officers” have unalienable “human rights”, such as Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security. That could also be why Canada can change CPP and OAS benefit terms on “you” at anytime.

Tax deductions are only usable by ITA “officers”

Exempt from Health Care Waits

Dr. Brian Day of Cambie Surgery Centre. www.brianday.ca

Dr. Brian Day of Cambie Surgery Centre. Photo: Jenelle Schneider / PNG Files

The Government says all Canadians have universal health care. But everyone is aware of the long waits to see specialists, or for surgery. In fact, Dr. Brian Day is suing the government over this. However, certain classes of persons, such as professional sports players and WCB claimants, do not have to wait. This is because they are exempt as “officers” as defined by various laws.

No Income Tax for “Indians”

Certificate of Indian Status Card.

Certificate of Indian Status Card.

Some of Canada’s indigenous people have unique “human rights”. One is certain income (“personal property of an Indian … on a reserve[4]) being exempt from income tax[5].

Therefore, while our income tax research, “Apu’s Theory”, concludes Canadian law deems all individuals as receiving income as Canada’s public money as ITA “officers”, those who also qualify as Indian Act “Indians” have this special “human right” – being exempt from income tax.

Conclusion

Canadian human rights vary due to “you” representing various officers. This is because, legally, officers must be unequal to private (or natural) persons who are not officers. Understanding this can remove tensions and stop infighting. Then, we should address the real issues. Here’s the first one: is Canada refusing to acknowledge this because you can choose to not represent such officers?

Legally, officers must be unequal to private persons who are not officers

This is a Cornerstone article.

  1. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948; Article 1. But, being only a declaration, it has no legal force or effect (just like CRA’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights).
  2. Not to be confused with a limited company where one individual is the only director and also the sole shareholder.
  3. Meads v. Meads, 2012 ABQB 571 (CanLII), paragraph 445. http://canlii.ca/t/fsvjq
  4. Indian Act, RSC 1985, c I-5, s.87 http://canlii.ca/t/5333k
  5. Income Tax Act, RSC 1985, c 1 (5th Supp), s.81(1)(a) http://canlii.ca/t/5390q.

 

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2 Comments

  1. […] for income tax liens and debts. But why is that? How is that even possible? Doesn’t that violate my human rights? After all, it doesn’t sound very […]

  2. […] tax is only for keeping spending in check and for controlling inflation. And there are lots of taxpayers working in Canada (and so have to pay income tax) to take care of […]

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